11 November 2010

Armistice Day


Military Cemetery
Verdun, France


GRASS

Pile the bodies high at Austerlitz and Waterloo.
Shovel them under and let me work -

I am the grass; I cover all.

And pile them high at Gettysburg
And pile them high at Ypres and Verdun.
Shovel them under and let me work.
Two years, ten years, and passengers ask the conductor:

What place is this?
Where are we now?

I am the grass.
Let me work.


- Carl Sandburgh -


World War I ended "At the Eleventh Hour of the Eleventh Day of the Eleventh Month" and that date was given the name of  Armistice Day  to close the "War to end all Wars".  Obviously it wasn't as the signing of the treaties set up the conditions for all the wars that have happened since.  Now it is simply known as "Veterans' Day" and honors all those who have died for all the flags of all the governments of all the countries who pray for victory over all the enemies.  So pile up the bodies and mark them with The Crosses, The Stars of Davids, The Crescent Moons, and all the symbols of the deities of peace whose adherents, for the sake of power and patriotism, send men and women to war.

May those currently in service in the latest round of conflicts come home safely to their families and the thanks of a grateful nation.  Better yet, may old men and women who have never fought never again send young men and women to die.

6 comments:

"Lois Grebowski" said...

That photo is sobering. Difficult to think that each one of those crosses are real people.

Thanks to our veterans and those who support them.

Mike Golch said...

A sobeing posthing,my heartfelt Thanks to all that put on a uniform to serve our country.

Michelle said...

The photo and poem are just perfect together. very moving.

Michelle said...

PS

My great great aunt was in France during WWI working for the medical services. She received war medals for her work in three wars.

Of all my family veterans I think I'm most proud of her.

Julia Smith said...

Hear, hear.

Travis Cody said...

Lovely tribute to our veterans.